Brain Plasticity Lab

University of Western Australia | The Perron Institute

The Brain Plasticity Lab’s research explores the physiological, cellular and molecular basis of brain plasticity in order to develop therapeutic strategies to improve brain plasticity in patients, with the goal of developing effective treatments for patients with neurotrauma and neurological disease. This includes utilizing non-invasive brain stimulation techniques such as repetitive transcranial stimulation and transcranial direct current stimulation.

Latest News

Latest Publications

2022

Intrinsic Plasticity Mechanisms of Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation.

Manipulating the Level of Sensorimotor Stimulation during LI-rTMS Can Improve Visual Circuit Reorganisation in Adult Ephrin-A2A5-/- Mice

Neurostructural Differences in Adolescents With Treatment-Resistant Depression and Treatment Effects of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation

Changes in the rodent gut microbiome following chronic restraint stress and low-intensity rTMS

A little goes a long way: Neurobiological effects of low intensity rTMS and implications for mechanisms of rTMS

2021

A Preclinical Study of Standard Versus Accelerated Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation for Depression in Adolescents

Subthreshold repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation drives structural synaptic plasticity in the young and aged motor cortex

White Matter Changes Following Chronic Restraint Stress and Neuromodulation: A Diffusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study in Young Male Rats

Subthreshold repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation drives structural synaptic plasticity in the young and aged motor cortex

Excitatory Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Over Prefrontal Cortex in a Guinea Pig Model Ameliorates Tinnitus

Age Related Response of Neonatal Rat Retinal Ganglion Cells to Reduced TrkB Signaling in vitro and in vivo

Moving Back in the Brain to Drive the Field Forward: Targeting Neurostimulation to Different Brain Regions in Animal Models of Depression and Neurodegeneration

Low intensity repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation drives structural synaptic plasticity in the young and aged motor cortex

Periaxonal and nodal plasticities modulate action potential conduction in the adult mouse brain